Monday, 17 February 2014

Contextual Framing


CONTEXT

Definition: the circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood.

One of the factors of the HPT-Transformation training is the directness.

The confrontational manner in which the training is presented shocks some people at the very start. After a while they take the loud, direct, powerful and confrontational manner of the training to be the norm.  They don't get 'used' to it...they simply accept it as 'that's how it is'. 

I have always believed that the training has to be that way.  It has always had that element of confrontation, wherever and to whoever I have presented it. A Seminar room with paying attendees or within a maximum security prison, the format is ALWAYS the same, because it works.

It is a wake up call and there must be a shock to the system to jolt the recipient of the training into change, reaction, self questioning and accountability.  The context of the training program, indeed the context of the training environment we create (in essence, the space for HPT to be completely effective) is a strict regime.

This in itself is unusual as it puts a group of people into an environment where the contextual frame and content is far removed from what they are used to on a quotidian basis.

Today, in St Helier in Jersey, the training session for a taster of HPT-Transformation took place.  One of the things that struck me was the contextual frame from which the training took place in comparison to the contextual frame the attendees were used to.  It became apparent to me and my two colleagues that context is a major factor in growth, experience and usuality.

Most people work from within a contextual framework. Unfortunately, this frame is too limiting for them on a long term basis.  Like a comfort zone, unless it is stretched and widened, no growth can take place or be achieved.
Life begins where your comfort zone ends!

When some people see an accident on the motorway where people die horribly and one can see the blood and mangled car and, in some cases the people, some people will faint.  Unfortunately, human nature means that people in other cars will slow down to have a look at the accident because they don't want to miss any experience.  In truth, they are just nosey.  They feel entitled to see.  The excitement takes over but then another feeling kicks in for many of them, they feel faint, nauseous and they pass out.

Anyone watching surgery for the first time will likely as not faint.  Anyone watching any medical procedure, from an autopsy to a minor operation, will feel, or may indeed, faint.

The reason is because the scene they are witnessing sits outside of the contextual framework they live in.

A surgeon, a traffic cop, a paramedic...they see this every single day, so it is WITHIN their quotidian Contextual Framework.

The HPT Training is not unusual to us because it sits within our contextual frame.  Some of the questions, presentations, directness, and even the training process itself is so far outside the context of the people taking the training it allows us to cut through the barriers, obstructions and masks that people wear on a daily basis.

We speak to the real person.  Not who they are at the time, or who they think they are.  We talk to who they REALLY are, behind all the masks and stuff that hides that.

Our authenticity is our contextual framework.  We sit outside their context and then we enter their framework and THIS allows us to strip them Back to Nothing, speak to the real them, and help them Transform.


"This is all about becoming the person you were DESTINED to be!   You need to release the REAL you!  That's right! The REAL you, the one that you were, the one that all this useless 'stuff' is hiding.......We need to strip you back. Back to NOTHING...so that the person you were meant to be recognizes the person you really are, and takes you into a future of endless possibility!" ~ Dave Moore



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